Cosmetic & Daily Care Products Has a Huge Impact in Our Today Life

Cosmetic & Daily Care Products
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The human skin serves as the body’s first line of defense against external chemical and microbiological dangers as it is the organ that is most exposed to the outside world. It maintains an individual-specific microbial environment that varies greatly over the surface of the body. According to recent research, makeup or antiperspirant use may affect the skin’s microbiome. However, because the process of skin turnover takes 21–28 days, these investigations’ short duration (7–10 days) and/or failure to wash off the volunteers’ original personal care items prevented a comprehensive assessment of microbial modifications. In contrast to individual variances, it is widely known that most adult human microbiomes, including those of the skin and other microbiomes, stay stable without intervention.

Despite the skin microbiome’s long-term stability, little is known about the chemicals that live there or how skin care products affect its chemistry. Utilizing mass spectrometry, it is possible to identify host molecules as well as customized lifestyles such as nutrition, medication, and personal care products. The effect of short-term nutritional treatments on the gut microbiome has been evaluated, but no study has yet examined how the skin’s chemistry and microbiota are affected by changes in the patients’ personal care routine.

In a recent metabolomic/microbiome 3D cartography investigation, we discovered that the presence of several skin care products affected the microbial populations. We, therefore, proposed that these products could alter particular skin microbial populations’ chemical environments, hence influencing them. Some compounds included in cosmetics may either encourage or prevent the growth of particular bacteria. For instance, moisturizers’ lipid components may act as food for lipophilic bacteria like Staphylococcus and Propionibacterium. Testing whether changes in personal habits can affect the ecology of the human skin and, possibly, host health requires an understanding of both the temporal fluctuations of the skin’s chemistry and microbiome. In order to assess these differences.

We combined metabolomics and microbiome data from skin samples of healthy human subjects using a multi-omics technique. Here, a number of ingredients from cosmetics remain on the skin for weeks after usage, indicating a sustained contribution to the chemistry of the environment where skin microorganisms thrive. Metabolomics analysis revealed temporal trends indicative of changes in the molecular makeup of the skin as well as correlations between stopping and starting the use of cosmetics. The microbiome has revealed that the chemistry, including hormones and pheromones like androstenone and androsterone, is highly individualized. Similarly, bacterial and molecular diversity and structure are changed by experimentally altering the participants’ personal care routine, especially for the feet and armpits. Interestingly, there is significant molecular and microbiological heterogeneity between individuals.

Results

Products for skin care and hygiene remain on the skin.

We haven’t yet looked at systematic ways to affect the microbiome and skin chemistry. Every three to four weeks, the skin’s top layer is replaced. Changing personal care has an impact on the microbiome and chemistry, and the compounds in personal care products that remain on the skin are mostly uncharacterized. nine weeks with twelve healthy individuals—six men and six females. Because one female volunteer withdrew owing to skin irritations, samples were taken from both the right and left sides of the body, including each arm, armpit, foot, and face. Throughout the first six weeks of the trial, all participants were required to follow the same daily personal care regimen. The participants were asked to refrain from using any personal care product for weeks 1–3 except for a mild body wash.

Along with using body wash, participants were instructed to apply particular commercial skin care products to certain body parts during weeks 4-6: a moisturizer on the arm, a sunscreen on the face, an antiperspirant in the armpits, and a foot powder to soothe the skin. Mass spectrometry was used to directly trace the molecular characteristics of the foot powder, facial lotion, moisturiser, and antiperspirant from the skin samples. The mass spectrometry results revealed that specific compounds found in cosmetic products accumulated over the course of 4-6 weeks. Avobenzone, dexpanthenol, and benzalkonium chloride from the facial sunscreen, trehalose 6-phosphate and glycerol stearate from the moisturizer applied to the arms, indolin, and an unidentified compound from the foot powder, among others, are examples of substances that were found  antiperspirant decapropylene glycol and nonapropylene glycol

Beyond only maintaining physical health, cosmetics can help us feel better, look better, and have higher self-esteem. They are a significant form of social expression because they may also aid in displaying personal flair.

In order to increase one’s self-esteem and confidence, makeup is utilized as a beauty aid. Cosmetics are now more significant than ever because so many people want to look and feel young and appealing. Today, a variety of cosmetic products are easily accessible, including lotions, lipstick, perfumes, eye shadow, nail polish, and hair spray.

There are two advantages to including personal care items into your everyday regimen. These items help you prevent the spread of germs and disease because they encourage good hygiene. Second, as they increase appeal, they help you in feeling good about yourself and your body.

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