Human Fight for Space

Human Fight for Space
Share on linkedin
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on reddit

The General Assembly designated 12 April as the International Day of Human Space Flight in its resolution A/RES/65/271 of 7 April 2011 in order to “”celebrate each year at the international level the beginning of the space era for humanity, reaffirming the important contribution of space science and technology in achieving sustainable development goals, increasing the well-being of States and peoples, as well as ensuring the realization of their aspiration to maintain outer space.””

The first human space voyage was made on April 12, 1961, by Soviet national Yuri Gagarin. The opportunity for space exploration for the benefit of all humanity was made possible by this momentous event.

The General Assembly stated its firm belief that it is in everyone’s best interests to advance and broaden space exploration and utilization for peaceful reasons, as it is the domain of all people, and to keep working to make these advantages available to all States.

The Voyager Golden Record: A reminder that we are all connected

The 1977 launch of the Voyager Golden Record, which sent a message from humanity to the cosmos, serves as a constant reminder of our interconnectedness. The United Nations shares a close relationship with the creation of the Golden Record and has a replica of it on display at its headquarters. The first words on the Record itself are those of the then-UN Secretary-General, expressing a wish for peace and friendship with whoever discovers and plays it. A NASA committee urged the UN to supply content to add to the playlist. The Planetary Society’s CEO, Bill Nye “”The Science Guy,”” explains to viewers how to interpret the Golden Record, its relevance today, and how awe of the cosmos can motivate action for our planet.

This is in line with the UN’s ongoing efforts to encourage global collaboration in the peaceful use and exploration of space. The Golden Record’s current relevance in our world is discussed by Simonetta Di Pippo, Director of the UN Office for Outer Space Affairs. The Voyager project’s implementation serves as a reminder of who we are, where we come from, and why we should care for one another.

Background

The first artificial Earth satellite, Sputnik I, was launched into space on October 4, 1957, paving the stage for further space research. Yuri Gagarin became the first person to orbit the Earth on April 12, 1961, beginning a new era in human space exploration.

The Declaration also highlights “”the incredible history of human presence in space and the remarkable achievements since the first human spaceflight, in particular, Valentina Tereshkova becoming the first woman to orbit the Earth on June 16, 1963, Neil Armstrong becoming the first person to set foot on the Moon on July 20, 1969, and the docking of the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft on July 17, 1975, which was the first international human mission in space, and recall that for the past decade humanity has maintained a multinational permanent human presence in outer space aboard the International Space Station.”

UN and Space

The United Nations recognized that the Space Age contributed a new dimension to humanity’s life from the very beginning. The United Nations family works tirelessly to improve all of humanity by utilizing the special advantages of space

The General Assembly adopted resolution 1348 (XIII), titled “”Question of the Peaceful Use of Outer Space,”” which addresses the shared human interest in space and seeks to provide answers to issues about how space may serve the people of Earth.

The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, or the “”Magna Carta of Space,”” came into effect on October 10, 1967.

The United Nations office charged with fostering global collaboration in the pacific uses of space today is the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). The United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, the only committee of the General Assembly dedicated only to international cooperation in the peaceful uses of space, is a secretariat by UNOOSA.

In addition, UNOOSA is in charge of upholding the United Nations Register of Objects Launched into Outer Space and carrying out the Secretary-General’s obligations under international space law.

Share This Article:

Share on linkedin
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on reddit

Related Posts